The Latest

Mar 27, 2014 / 2 notes

Stoked for the Audio Frenzy Spring show at the Alamo Gallery in Socorro New Mexico this Saturday. Daisy and I are going to open up with an experimental set, after which we will be joined by Keith Morris and Clifton Murray on drums and bass respectively for the rest of the show.

Our performance will be followed by a Roon set 3-5.

Hope to see you there!

arterrorist:

Our cat Koshka and our vinyl records :)

He looks like our cat Maceo Parker but as a little kitten! And oh does he love vinyl!
Mar 20, 2014 / 57 notes

arterrorist:

Our cat Koshka and our vinyl records :)

He looks like our cat Maceo Parker but as a little kitten! And oh does he love vinyl!

(via callmebert)

beatle-sexual:

"Vinyl is the real deal. I’ve always felt like, until you buy a vinyl record, you don’t really own the album. And it’s not just me or a little pet thing or some kind of retro romantic thing of the past. It is still alive."

Well Said!
Mar 20, 2014 / 1,174 notes

beatle-sexual:

"Vinyl is the real deal. I’ve always felt like, until you buy a vinyl record, you don’t really own the album. And it’s not just me or a little pet thing or some kind of retro romantic thing of the past. It is still alive."

Well Said!

(via callmebert)

Mar 19, 2014 / 6 notes

Audio Frenzy celebrating addition of new Tool vinyl to our already awesome record collection.

laekoa:

☮nature, vintage, hippie blog☮ following back similar
Mar 16, 2014 / 4,668 notes

laekoa:

☮nature, vintage, hippie blog☮ following back similar

(via negativelycharged)

Mar 5, 2014 / 1 note

Audio Frenzy - Bob Dylan, Highway 61 Cover

Mar 5, 2014

Daisy Morgan Edel singing and playing native american flutes

Mar 5, 2014
Mar 3, 2014 / 4 notes

Audio Frenzy, Joined by Clifton Murray on bass playing a cover of Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited at the Old Town Bistro’s Bob Dylan Night in Socorro, NM.

Free Download!

Feb 28, 2014 / 43 notes

hpvinyl:

On the turntable:

David Gilmour, On an island

180g vinyl, gatefold cover, giant poster

Sweet!

stasmanart:

El Squido!
Jan 11, 2014 / 3 notes

stasmanart:

El Squido!

stasmanart:

One of our kitties, Maceo Parker, done in ink
:-D
check out more of my art here stasmanart.tumblr.com

Hello Maceo Parker!
Jan 11, 2014 / 86 notes

stasmanart:

One of our kitties, Maceo Parker, done in ink

:-D

check out more of my art here stasmanart.tumblr.com

Hello Maceo Parker!


“James Luna often uses his body as a means to critique the objectification of Native American cultures in Western museum and cultural displays.  He dramatically calls attention to the exhibition of Native American peoples and Native American cultural objects in his Artifact Piece, 1985-87.  For the performance piece Luna donned a loincloth and lay motionless on a bed of sand in a glass museum exhibition case.  Luna remained on exhibit for several days, among the Kumeyaay exhibits at the Museum of Man in San Diego.  Labels surrounding the artist’s body identified his name and commented on the scars on his body, attributing them to “excessive drinking.”  Two other cases in the exhibition contained Luna’s personal documents and ceremonial items from the Luiseño reservation.
Many museum visitors as they approached the “exhibit” were stunned to discover that the encased body was alive and even listening and watching the museum goers.  In this way the voyeuristic gaze of the viewer was returned, redirecting the power relationship.
Through the performance piece Luna also called attention to a tendency in Western museum displays to present Native American cultures as extinct cultural forms.  Viewers who happened upon Luna’s exhibition expecting a museum presentation of native American cultures as “dead,” were shocked by the living, breathing, “undead” presence of the luiseño artist in the display.  Luna in Artifact Piece places his body as the object of display in order to disrupt the modes of representation in museum exhibitions of native others and to claim subjectivity for the silenced voices eclipsed in these displays. “  
Jan 10, 2014 / 3,813 notes

James Luna often uses his body as a means to critique the objectification of Native American cultures in Western museum and cultural displays.  He dramatically calls attention to the exhibition of Native American peoples and Native American cultural objects in his Artifact Piece, 1985-87.  For the performance piece Luna donned a loincloth and lay motionless on a bed of sand in a glass museum exhibition case.  Luna remained on exhibit for several days, among the Kumeyaay exhibits at the Museum of Man in San Diego.  Labels surrounding the artist’s body identified his name and commented on the scars on his body, attributing them to “excessive drinking.”  Two other cases in the exhibition contained Luna’s personal documents and ceremonial items from the Luiseño reservation.

Many museum visitors as they approached the “exhibit” were stunned to discover that the encased body was alive and even listening and watching the museum goers.  In this way the voyeuristic gaze of the viewer was returned, redirecting the power relationship.

Through the performance piece Luna also called attention to a tendency in Western museum displays to present Native American cultures as extinct cultural forms.  Viewers who happened upon Luna’s exhibition expecting a museum presentation of native American cultures as “dead,” were shocked by the living, breathing, “undead” presence of the luiseño artist in the display.  Luna in Artifact Piece places his body as the object of display in order to disrupt the modes of representation in museum exhibitions of native others and to claim subjectivity for the silenced voices eclipsed in these displays. “
  

(via addamatic)

tentacular-art:

Squid of the Day
Watercolor Squid.
http://www.etsy.com/shop/WoodPigeon
Jan 5, 2014 / 68 notes

tentacular-art:

Squid of the Day

Watercolor Squid.

http://www.etsy.com/shop/WoodPigeon